World Hepatitis Day 2022

Read the German version of this article.

World Hepatitis Day 2022 – HHA calls for a test offensive for more clarity.
The prerequisites for this are already in place!

July 28th is World Hepatitis Day again, with which the World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA) has been drawing attention to the dangers of viral liver diseases and many other liver diseases every year since 2011. The goal is to eliminate hepatitis B and C by 2030 and to finally raise awareness of liver diseases in Austria. In Austria, this goal is being promoted by the Hepatitis Aid Austria – Platform Healthy Liver Platform (HHA) headed by Angelika Widhalm. As part of the Covid-19 pandemic response, test structures have been established in recent years, which should also be used for the hepatitis rapid tests in order to „finally shed light on the enormous number of unreported cases,“ says Widhalm.

 
 

World Hepatitis Day on July 28th has been held worldwide since 2011 to raise awareness of all viral hepatitis (inflammation of the liver caused by virus) and to eliminate these serious liver diseases by 2030. „In order to be able to achieve this goal, new test strategies must be developed,“ emphasizes Angelika Widhalm, Chair of Hepatitis Aid Austria – Platform Healthy Liver (HHA). She is therefore calling on the national government to speed up the fight against viral hepatitis – above all through educational campaigns, screening programs, vaccination and easy and low-threshold access to respective therapies. In addition, Widhalm would like to motivate everyone to get tested. A diseased liver often goes undetected. Chronic hepatitis B and C in particular can gradually damage the liver without the affected person noticing anything. “Every 30 seconds someone dies from viral hepatitis! Let yourself be tested”, Widhalm therefore appeals to Mr and Mrs Austrian „You could save your liver and therefore your life!“

The good news: There are effective vaccinations against hepatitis A and B that protect against infection. Unfortunately, the vaccination rate in Austria is currently only around 60%. „Due to the newborn vaccinations since 1999, we expect further increase in the vaccination coverage in the next few years,“ says Widhalm confidently.

Since 2015, hepatitis C has been curable with a therapy with few side effects, which also has a significantly higher success rate compared to previous therapies.. „In the past, however, the therapies were notorious for their severe side effects, which is why many people simply did not dare to use these therapies,“ Widhalm looks back. „With the so-called DAA’s (direct acting agents), these times are over: comparatively free of side effects and with a reliable healing rate, our recommendation to everyone: do not wait any longer, hepatitis can’t wait.“

There have also been great successes in the treatment of the more recent hepatitis D (delta). This viral liver disease only occurs in connection with hepatitis B and „increases the risk of severe courses fourfold compared to a pure HBV infection,“ emphasizes Primarius, Prof. Priv.Doz. dr Arnulf Ferlitsch, specialist in internal medicine, additional specialist in gastroenterology, hepatology, specialist in internal intensive care medicine, head of the department of internal medicine, gastroenterology and nephrology in the KH der Barmherzige Brüder in Vienna, board member of Austrian Gastroenterological Society (ÖGGH) and Advisory Board of the HHA. But there is also a new, highly effective drug for hepatitis B.

Use Covid-19 test structures and “shed light on the unreported figure”

“In Austria, one must still assume that most of the people who are identified with viral hepatitis do not know anything about their illness,” Widhalm points out one of the main problems associated with this serious illness. “The number of unreported cases is enormous. As a result, most of them only find out about their disease very late, namely through severe liver damage and other serious sequelae caused by these infections. Unfortunately, it is often much too late!” Margit Winterleitner, Head Physician BMJ, is convinced. „Because after 2 years of the Covid 19 pandemic, there is a PCR test structure in Austria that enables continuous and sufficient diagnostics. In addition, we are now slowly getting back to the risk groups.”

Also Dr Gottfried Hirnschall, former Director HIV Department and Global Hepatitis Program of the WHO and Advisory Board of the HHA, emphasizes that hepatitis is still one of the most common and serious diseases worldwide. He speaks of around 3 million new infections every year worldwide and around 1.1 million people who die every year as a result of viral hepatitis. Therefore, he also calls on the health services worldwide and in Austria to bring the test and therapy offers as close as possible to the population.

New widespread disease: Fatty Liver

„A non-infectious liver disease that claims many lives worldwide, but especially in Europe, America and Australia, is still underestimated by many doctors and health politicians: fatty liver – the new widespread disease no. 1,“ explains the HHA chairwoman. It is most often caused by an excessive intake of processed sugars such as corn syrup combined with insufficient exercise, an unbalanced diet (too many carbohydrates, not enough protein) and alcohol. „In Austria, every third man and every fourth woman is already affected,“ says Dr. Ferlitsch concrete figures on this. „Fatty liver is now the most common reason for a liver transplant!“ He therefore calls for appropriate preventive measures and campaigns to inform the population about this disease.

In this context, the HHA demands that all necessary examinations are carried out in the event of elevated liver values and that these are also reimbursed by the health insurance companies. „Unfortunately, that’s not the case at the moment,“ Widhalm refers to a rigorous grievance in this country. „Basically, the elastography examination (FibroScan) should be included in the measures of a conventional preventive examination!“ Preventive therapies must finally be reimbursed by the health insurance companies. For example, the so-called rare liver diseases (PBC; PSC; AIH, Wilson’s disease …) could be recognized in good time so that those affected could be treated quickly.

But there is also good news with regard to fatty liver: „The first studies for a new drug are underway in Austria,“ emphasizes Dr. Ferlitsch, who also calls for awareness of the dangers of fatty liver and fatty liver hepatitis to be created within the population.

Liver cancer is increasing at an alarming rate – new therapies: Primar Dr. Ferlitsch expressly emphasizes that liver cancer has increased exponentially in Austria in recent years and has the third highest cancer death rate. The good news: „There is a good new therapy option with already good results in order to be able to fight this cancer even more successfully,“ says the HHA chairwoman.

The biggest risk factors at a glance

  • overweight
  • Lack of exercise
  • wrong diet
  • alcohol
  • as well as genetic risk factors

WHO Key-Facts about viral hepatitis

An estimated 15 million Europeans are chronically infected, including 5.5 million living in the EU; 27,000-29,000 new HCV cases are diagnosed in the EU/EEA each year. Evidence shows that in some European countries the annual death toll from HCV has quadrupled over the past 20 years.

Demands of the HHA

  • Regular screening for liver disease.
  • Offer of free rapid viral hepatitis tests for the population as part of the corona test stations.
  • Every hepatitis B patient must be tested once for hepatitis D (delta) in order to initiate the new therapy in good time.
  • The creation of a future-oriented hepatitis action plan, which the WHO has been calling for for years, also in Austria.
  • Reimbursement of all necessary examinations of the liver (elastography).
  • Reimbursement of all proven medical products and nutritional therapies for fatty liver.

About the Hepatitis Aid Austria – Healthy Liver Platform

The Hepatitis Aid Austria – Healthy Liver Platform (HHA) was founded in 2000 by dedicated patients together with doctors and partners from health policy. Since then, the non-profit association has acted as an interface between patients and physicians, authorities, ministries, the Chamber of Labor and Commerce, social security institutions, health insurance companies and regional authorities here in Austria. A scientific advisory board, consisting of well-known medical specialists and scientists, ensures that the HHA’s medical information is reliable, up-to-date and serious. In the future, Hepatitis Aid Austria will work even more closely than before with all the responsible authorities, ministries and relevant institutions in the country, as well as the media.

Read the German version of this article.

Welt-Hepatitis-Tag 2022

Zur englischen Version dieses Artikels.

Am 28. Juli ist der Welt-Hepatitis-Tag, mit dem auf die Gefahren von viralen Lebererkrankungen sowie vieler anderer Lebererkrankungen aufmerksam macht. Das Ziel ist es, Hepatitis B und C bis zum Jahr 2030 zu eliminieren und die Awareness für Lebererkrankungen allgemein – auch in Österreich – zu heben .

Welt-Hepatitis-Tag 2022 – HHÖ fordert Test-Offensive für mehr Klarheit. Die Voraussetzungen dafür sind bereits vorhanden!

Am 28. Juli ist wieder Welt-Hepatitis-Tag, mit dem die World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA) seit 2011 jährlich auf die Gefahren von viralen Lebererkrankungen sowie vieler anderer Lebererkrankungen aufmerksam macht. Das Ziel ist es, Hepatitis B und C bis zum Jahr 2030 zu eliminieren und die Awareness für Lebererkrankungen in Österreich endlich zu heben. In Österreich wird dieses Ziel von der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ) rund um Vorsitzende Angelika Widhalm vorangetrieben. Durch die Covid-19-Pandemie wurden innerhalb der letzten Jahre optimale Teststrukturen etabliert, die auch für die nötigen Hepatitis-Schnelltests genutzt werden sollten, um die enorme „Dunkelziffer zu erhellen“, so Widhalm.

 

bereits seit 2011 wird der Welt Hepatitis Tag am 28. Juli weltweit abgehalten, um die Awareness für alle viralen Hepatitiden (virale Leberentzündungen) zu steigern und um diese schweren Lebererkrankungen bis 2030 zu eliminieren. „Um dieses Ziel erreichen zu können, müssen neue Teststrategien entwickelt werden“, betont Angelika Widhalm, Vorsitzende der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ). Daher ruft auch sie die heimische Regierung auf, den Kampf gegen virale Hepatitis zügig voranzutreiben – vor allem durch Aufklärungskampagnen, Screeningprogramme, Impfung und einen niederschwelligen und einfachen Zugang zu den jeweiligen Therapien. Zudem möchte Widhalm alle Menschen motivieren, sich testen zu lassen. Denn oft bleibt eine kranke Leber unerkannt. Vor allem eine chronische Hepatitis B und C können die Leber schleichend schädigen, ohne dass die Betroffenen etwas merken. „Alle 30 Sekunden stirbt ein Mensch an viraler Hepatitis! Lass dich testen“, appelliert Widhalm daher an Herrn und Frau Österreicher. „Du könntest Deine Leber und somit Dein Leben retten.“

Die gute Nachricht: Gegen Hepatitis A und B gibt es wirksame Impfungen, die vor einer Infektion schützen. Leider liegt die Durchimpfungsrate in Österreich aktuell erst bei rund 60%. „Aufgrund der Neugeborenen-Impfungen seit 1999 erwarten wir hier ein Ansteigen der Durchimpfungsrate in den nächsten Jahren“, zeigt sich Widhalm zuversichtlich.

Seit 2015 ist Hepatitis C mit einer nebenwirkungsarmen Therapie heilbar, die im Vergleich zu früheren Therapien auch noch eine deutlich höhere Erfolsrate hat. „In der Vergangenheit waren die Therapien jedoch berüchtigt für ihre schweren Nebenwirkungen, weswegen sich viele Menschen einfach nicht getraut haben, diese Therapien in Anspruch zu nehmen“, blickt Widhalm zurück. „Mit den sogenannten DAA‘s (direct acting agents) sind diese Zeiten vorbei: vergleichsweise nebenwirkungsfrei und mit einer zuverlässigen Heilungsrate können wir allen empfehlen, nicht länger zu warten.“

Auch bei der Therapie der noch jüngeren Hepatitis D (Delta) gibt es große Erfolge. Diese virale Lebererkrankung tritt nur in Verbindung mit Hepatitis B auf und erhöht „das Risiko für schwere Verläufe um das Vierfache im Vergleich zu einer reinen HBV-Infektion“, betont Primarius, Prof. Priv.Doz. Dr. Arnulf Ferlitsch, Facharzt für Innere Medizin Zusatzfacharzt für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie, Facharzt für Internistische Intensivmedizin, Leiter der Abteilung Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie und Nephrologie im KH der Barmherzigen Brüder in Wien, Vorstandsmitglied der Österr. Gastroenterologischen Gesellschaft (ÖGGH) und Fach-Beirat der HHÖ. Doch auch für Hepatitis B existiert ein neues, hochwirksames Medikament.

Covid-19-Teststrukturen nutzen und „Dunkelziffer erhellen“

„Nach wie vor muss man in Österreich davon ausgehen, dass die meisten Menschen, die mit viraler Hepatitis identifiziert sind, nichts von ihrer Erkrankung wissen“, verweist Widhalm auf eines der Hauptprobleme im Zusammenhang mit dieser schweren Erkrankung. „Die Dunkelziffer ist enorm hoch. Das führt dazu, dass die meisten von ihnen erst sehr spät, nämlich durch schwere Leberschäden und anderen schweren Folgeschäden, die diese Infektionen verursachen, von ihrem Schicksal erfahren. Oft leider auch viel zu spät!“  Diese Dunkelziffer könnte man jetzt allerdings leicht erhellen, ist Mag. Dr. Margit Winterleitner, Chefärztin BMJ, überzeugt. „Denn nach 2 Jahren Covid-19-Pandemie gibt es in Österreich eine PCR-Teststruktur, die eine durchgehende und ausreichende Diagnostik ermöglicht. Außerdem kommen wir jetzt langsam wieder an die Risikogruppen heran.“ 

Auch Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall, ehemaliger Director HIV-Department and Global Hepatitis Program der WHO sowie Beirat der HHÖ, betont, dass Hepatitis nach wie vor eine der häufigsten und schwersten Erkrankungen weltweit ist. Er spricht von jährlich rund 3 Mio. Neuinfektionen weltweit und von etwa 1,1 Mio. Menschen, die jedes Jahr an den Folgen einer viralen Hepatitis sterben. Daher fordert auch er die Gesundheitsdienste global sowie in Österreich auf, die Test- und Therapieangebote möglichst nahe an die Bevölkerung zu bringen.

Neue Volkskrankheit Fettleber

„Eine nicht infektiöse Lebererkrankung, die weltweit, aber vor allem in Europa, Amerika und Australien viele Todesopfer fordert, wird von vielen Ärzten und Gesundheitspolitikern noch unterschätzt: die Fettleber – die neue Volkskrankheit Nr. 1“, erläutert die HHÖ-Vorsitzende. Meist wird sie durch eine übermäßige Aufnahme von industriell verarbeitetem Zucker wie etwa Maisstärkesirup in Kombination mit zu wenig Bewegung, einer nicht ausgewogenen Ernährung (zu viel Kohlenhydrate, zu wenig Proteine) und Alkohol verursacht. „In Österreich sind jeder 3. Mann und jede 4. Frau betroffen“, liefert Dr. Ferlitsch konkrete Zahlen dazu. „Die Fettleber ist mittlerweile der häufigste Grund für eine Lebertransplantation!“ Er fordert daher entsprechende Präventionsmaßnahmen und Kampagnen, um die Bevölkerung über diese Erkrankung zu informieren.

Die HHÖ fordert in diesem Zusammenhang, dass bei erhöhten Leberwerten alle nötigen Untersuchungen durchgeführt werden und diese auch von den Krankenkassen refundiert werden. „Das ist aktuell leider nicht der Fall“, verweist Widhalm auf einen rigorosen Missstand hierzulande. „Grundsätzlich sollten die Elastographie Untersuchung (FibroScan) in die Maßnahmen einer herkömmlichen Vorsorgeuntersuchung aufgenommen werden!“ Auch Präventionstherapien müssen endlich von den Krankenkassen refundiert werden. So könnte man u.a. auch die sogenannten seltenen Lebererkrankungen (PBC; PSC; AIH, Morbus Wilson …) rechtzeitig erkennen, um die Betroffenen rasch therapieren zu können.

Aber auch hinsichtlich der Fettleber gibt es eine gute Nachricht: „In Österreich laufen die ersten Studien für ein neues Medikament an“, betont Dr. Ferlitsch, der ebenfalls fordert, dass ein Bewusstsein innerhalb der Bevölkerung für die Gefahren einer Fettleber respektive der Fettleberhepatitis geschaffen werden muss.

Leberkrebs steigt erschreckend an – neue Therapien: Primar Dr. Ferlitsch betont ausdrücklich, dass Leberkrebs in Österreich in den letzten Jahren überdimensional angestiegen ist und die dritthöchste Todesrate an Krebserkrankungen aufweist. Die gute Nachricht: „Es gibt eine gute neue Therapieoption mit bereits guten Ergebnissen, um so diesen Krebs noch erfolgreicher bekämpfen zu können“, so die HHÖ-Vorsitzende.

Die Risikofaktoren auf einen Blick

  • Übergewicht
  • Bewegungsmangel
  • falsche Ernährung
  • Alkohol
  • sowie genetische Risikofaktoren

Key-Facts zur viralen Hepatitis von der WHO

Geschätzte 15 Millionen Europäer sind chronisch infiziert, eingeschlossen 5,5 Millionen, die in der EU leben; jedes Jahr werden 27.000-29.000 neue HCV-Fälle in der EU/EEA diagnostiziert. Beweise zeigen, dass sich in einigen europäischen Ländern die jährliche Todesrate durch HCV in den letzten 20 Jahren vervierfacht hat. 

Forderungen der HHÖ auf einen Blick

  • Regelmäßige Screenings auf Lebererkrankungen.
  • Angebot von kostenlosen viralen Hepatitis-Schnelltests für die Bevölkerung im Rahmen der Corona-Teststationen.
  • Jeder Hepatitis B-Patient muss einmal auf Hepatitis D (Delta) getestet werden, um rechtzeitig die neue Therapie einzuleiten.
  • Die Erstellung eines von der WHO seit Jahren geforderten zukunftsorientierten Hepatitis-Aktions-Planes auch in Österreich.
  • Refundierung aller notwendigen Untersuchungen der Leber (Elastographie).
  • Refundierung aller bewährten Medizinprodukte und Ernährungstherapien bei Fettleber.

Über die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform gesunde Leber

Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ) wurde im Jahr 2000 von engagierten Patienten gemeinsam mit Ärzten und den Partnern aus der Gesundheitspolitik gegründet. Seither fungiert der gemeinnützige Verein als Schnittstelle zwischen PatientInnen und MedizinerInnen, Behörden, Ministerien, Arbeiter- und Wirtschaftskammer, Sozialversicherungsträgern, Krankenkassen sowie regionalen Behörden hier in Österreich. Ein wissenschaftlicher Beirat, bestehend aus namhaften Fachärzten und Wissenschaftlern, gewährleistet die Zuverlässigkeit, Aktualität und Seriosität der medizinischen Informationen der HHÖ. Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich wird künftig noch enger als bisher mit allen zuständigen Behörden, Ministerien und einschlägigen Institutionen des Landes sowie den Medien zusammenarbeiten.

Rückfragen richten Sie bitte an

HHÖ-Vorsitzende Angelika Widhalm

Tel: 0676/5204124

E-Mail: info@gesundeleber.at

Angelika Widhalm
Vorsitzende der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ). © HHÖ
Primarius, Prof. Priv.Doz. Dr. Arnulf Ferlitsch, Facharzt für Innere Medizin Zusatzfacharzt für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie, Facharzt für Internistische Intensivmedizin, Leiter der Abteilung Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie und Nephrologie im KH der Barmherzigen Brüder in Wien, Vorstandsmitglied der Österr. Gastroenterologischen Gesellschaft (ÖGGH) und Fach-Beirat der HHÖ. © Schedl BBWien
Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall, ehemaliger Director HIV-Department and Global Hepatitis Program der WHO sowie Beirat der HHÖ. © HHÖ
Mag. Dr. Margit Winterleitner, Chefärztin BMJ. © HHÖ

Zur englischen Version dieses Artikels.

„Hepatitis kann nicht warten!“ Welt-Hepatitis-Tag am 28. Juli 2021

Am 28. Juli ist wieder Welt-Hepatitis-Tag, mit dem die World Hepatitis Alliance (WHA) seit 2011 jährlich auf die Gefahren von viralen Lebererkrankungen aufmerksam macht, um Hepatitis B und C bis 2030 zu eliminieren. Das diesjährige Motto: „Hep can’t wait“ – „Hepatitis kann nicht warten!“ In Österreich wird dieses Ziel von der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ) rund um Vorsitzende Angelika Widhalm vorangetrieben.

Gesundheitsminister Dr. Wolfgang Mückstein unterstützt den Welt-Hepatitis-Tag 2021 und die HHÖ und lässt in einer Grußbotschaft wissen: „Gemeinsam beenden wir Hepatitis bis 2030“. 

Gesundheitsexperte und ehemaliger Direktor des HIV und Hepatitis Programmes der WHO Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall ruft auf rasch zu handeln, da auch in Österreich noch einiges zu tun ist.

Da weltweit alle 30 Sekunden eine Person an einer Hepatitis-bedingten Krankheit stirbt – auch in der aktuellen COVID-19-Krise – können wir nicht länger warten, um etwas gegen virale Hepatitis zu tun.

Ziel der WHO ist die Elimination viraler Hepatitis bis 2030

Videobotschaften anlässlich des Welt-Hepatitis-Tages 2021

Gesundheitsminister
Dr. Mückstein

Ehemaliger WHO Direktor
Dr. Hirnschall

Vorsitzende der HHÖ
Angelika Widhalm

Find the missing millions!”

Aufruf der Weltgesundheitsorganisation WHO. 9 von 10 Betroffenen wissen nicht, dass sie mit viraler Hepatitis infiziert sind.

Forderungen der HHÖ

  • Regelmäßige Screenings in Risikogruppen.
  • Angebot von kostenlosen Hepatitis-Schnelltests im Rahmen der Corona-Teststationen für die Bevölkerung.
  • Jeder Hepatitis B-Patient muss einmal auf Hepatitis D (Delta) getestet werden, um rechtzeitig die neue Therapie der Hepatitis Delta einzuleiten und damit eine rapide Verschlechterung der Lebererkrankung und somit die Gefahr des frühen Todes zu verringern.
  • Endlich die Erstellung eines von der WHO seit Jahren geforderten Hepatitis-Aktions-Planes und nicht nur eine Erfassung der derzeitigen Situation (aus 2019).

Key-Facts zu viraler Hepatitis 

  • In der EU sterben jedes Jahr mehr Menschen an HCV als an HIV.
  • HCV ist 7mal häufiger als HIV in Europa.
  • Geschätzte 15 Millionen Europäer sind chronisch infiziert, eingeschlossen 5,5 Millionen, die in der EU leben; jedes Jahr werden 27.000-29.000 neue HCV-Fälle in der EU/EEA diagnostiziert.
  • Beweise zeigen, dass sich in einigen europäischen Ländern die jährliche Todesrate durch HCV in den letzten 20 Jahren vervierfacht hat.

 Aktuelles in Stichworten zu den jeweiligen Virus-Varianten:

  • Hepatitis A+B – Kombinationsimpfung:

Vorzeige-Beispiel, dass Impfungen funktionieren (!) und der Nutzen für die Gesellschaft eindeutig nachweisbar ist. Weiterhin wichtig, Impfbereitschaft besonders bei (Klein)Kindern darf nicht weiter sinken. Hepatitis A+B-Impfung von Kindern und Jugendlichen ist gut und wirkt in Österreich! Diese Impfung verhindert die Infektion (auch von D) und somit auch die Entstehung von Zirrhose, Leberkrebs und Notwendigkeit von Lebertransplantationen. Somit: Impfung = Krebsvorsorge!!!

  • Hepatitis C – Therapie bringt Heilung:

Therapie mit den DAAs bringt Heilungsquote >90%, sollte jedem so schnell wie möglich zugänglich gemacht werden. Je früher Therapiebeginn -> Besserer Outcome -> weniger Zirrhose/Krebs/Transplantation/Tod. Jeder, der in Österreich seine Diagnose erhält und in Österreich versichert ist, hat sofort Anspruch auf eine DAA-Therapie!

  • Hepatitis D – Neue Erkenntnisse:

Impfung gegen Hep B schützt auch vor Hep. D. Hep. D kann ohne Hepatitis B nicht im Körper existieren. Das „Huckepackvirus“ braucht das Hepatitis B-Virus, um zu überleben. Doppelinfektion verschlimmert Verlauf und Therapieerfolg deutlich.

Deutlich mehr Hep. B PatientInnen als bisher angenommen sind auch mit Hep. D infiziert; Hep. B Patienten brauchen Screening auf Hep. D. Neue Therapien zugelassen und im Kommen, deswegen macht es aktuell vermehrt Sinn zu testen, da eine Lösung verfügbar ist.

  • Hepatitis E – Schwangerschaftsrisikofaktor:

Sehr großer Risikofaktor bei Schwangeren. Schwangere sollten standardisiert (mindestens) auf Hep. E getestet werden. Zoonose vom Schwein, auch in Österreich schon so weit verbreitet, dass alle Blutkonserven darauf getestet werden müssen. Blutkonserven werden in Österreich unter anderem auch auf virale Hepatitis B und C untersucht.

Statement von Primarius, Prof. Priv.Doz. Dr. Arnulf Ferlitsch zu Hepatitis D

Dr. Ferlitsch ist Facharzt für Innere Medizin, Zusatzfacharzt für Gastroenterologie, Hepatologie, Facharzt für Internistische Intensivmedizin, Leiter der Abteilung Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie und Nephrologie im KH der Barmherzigen Brüder in Wien, Vorstandsmitglied der Österr. Gastroenterologischen Gesellschaft (ÖGGH) und Fach-Beirat der HHÖ

Die chronische Hepatitis D ist eine seltene Erkrankung und braucht immer auch eine Infektion mit dem Hepatitis B-Virus. Eine Hepatitis-B-Impfung bietet auch Schutz vor einer Hepatitis D-Infektion. In Österreich sind Infektionen mit dem Hepatitis D-Virus eher selten. In bestimmten Risikogruppen der Bevölkerung kommt sie öfter vor. Bei jedem Patienten mit HBV muss zumindest einmal nach Hepatitis D mittels Antikörper gesucht werden. Wenn die Infektion, die meistens, über das Blut erfolgt, weniger über sexuelle Kontakte oder im Rahmen des Geburtsvorganges übertragen wird, kommt es bei einer gleichzeitigen Infektion mit HBV in 5 % zum Auftreten einer chronischen Hepatitis D. Wenn die Infektion mit der Hepatitis D später erfolgt, geht eine akute Hepatitis B in 70 – 90 % in eine chronische Hepatitis D mit schweren Verläufen über. Sie führt meist innerhalb weniger Jahre zur Leberzirrhose.

Das Risiko für schwere Verläufe ist 4 x so hoch im Vergleich zu einer reinen HBV-Infektion. Bis vor Kurzem war Interferon Alpha die einzige zugelassene Therapie, die wohl den Nachweis einer Virusinfektion und die Infektiosität unter der Therapie verhinderte, jedoch nur sehr geringe Heilungschancen hatte. Seit dem heurigen Jahr gibt es eine neue von der EMA zugelassene Therapie mit der Substanz Bulevirtid (Hepcludex). Es ist eine täglich selbst zu verabreichende Spritze unter die Haut. Immerhin 33 % hatten in der Zulassungsstudie ein Ansprechen mit fehlendem Nachweis von Hepatitis D-Viren, die auch 24 Wochen nach Behandlungsende noch deutlich sichtbar ist. Studien in der Kombination von Interferon mit Bulevirtid laufen mit einem synergistischen Effekt. Auch dürfte eine höhere Dosierung (10 mg statt 2 mg täglich) einen positiven Effekt auf die Wirkung haben. Es kommt als einzige Nebenwirkung bei erhöhter Dosis zu einem Ansteigen der Gallensäure im Blut, was überraschenderweise aber asymptomatisch für die Patienten ist. Es besteht noch weitere Hoffnung für Hepatitis D-Patienten. Es sind noch derzeit 3 vielversprechende Substanzen in Studien, die die Heilung für diese schwerste Virushepatitisform ermöglichen sollen.

Über die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform gesunde Leber

Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ) wurde im Jahr 2000 von engagierten Patienten gemeinsam mit Ärzten und den Partnern aus der Gesundheitspolitik gegründet. Seither fungiert der gemeinnützige Verein als Schnittstelle zwischen PatientInnen und MedizinerInnen, Behörden, Ministerien, Arbeiter- und Wirtschaftskammer, Sozialversicherungsträgern, Krankenkassen sowie regionalen Behörden hier in Österreich. Ein wissenschaftlicher Beirat, bestehend aus namhaften Fachärzten und Wissenschaftlern, gewährleistet die Zuverlässigkeit, Aktualität und Seriosität der medizinischen Informationen der HHÖ. Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich wird künftig noch enger als bisher mit allen zuständigen Behörden, Ministerien und einschlägigen Institutionen des Landes sowie den Medien zusammenarbeiten.

Weiterführende Links

HHÖ-Online-PK zur European Testing Week 2020 – Testen, Finden, Therapieren, Heilen

Noch bis 22. Mai steht die European Testing Week 2020 für HBV/HCV/HIV/SARS-CoV-2 (Coronavirus) auf dem WHO Gesundheitsprogramm in Europa. Auch heuer wird diese Testoffensive hierzulande unter anderem wieder von der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ) rund um Vorsitzende Angelika Widhalm initiiert. „Nur wenn rechtzeitig Vorsichtsmaßnahmen getroffen werden, informiert, getestet und in weiter Folge therapiert wird, haben wir weltweit eine Chance, die Ziele der WHO (z.B.: Eliminierung viraler Hepatitis weltweit bis 2030) zu erreichen. Virale Hepatitis ist mittlerweile in den meisten Fällen therapier- bzw. heilbar, HIV/Aids ist heute sehr gut therapierbar. Für Corona sind alle zur Verfügung stehenden Ressourcen zu bündeln, um die weltweit laufenden Initiativen zu unterstützen“, betont Widhalm. 

Mit der Europäischen Testwoche soll vor allem eine Awareness geschaffen werden, „damit der Testwille der Bevölkerung erhöht wird und dadurch die dringende Notwendigkeit von bundesweit einheitlichen, qualitätsgesicherten und niederschwelligen Teststrukturen erkannt wird und diese tatsächlich auch in Angriff genommen werden“, so die HHÖ-Vorsitzende. „Bei viraler Hepatitis sollte gemäß Empfehlungen der CDC jeder zwischen 18 und 79 Jahren getestet werden. Dafür reicht es allerdings nicht, wenn man in den Ambulanzen einfach wartet, bis die Leute kommen. Man muss aktiv auf die Bevölkerung zugehen – mit einem bundesweiten Angebot an qualitätsgesicherten niederschwelligen Testmöglichkeiten für virale Erkrankungen. Unser Ziel muss sein: Testen, Finden, Therapieren, Heilen.“

Zahlen, Daten, Fakten

Bei der Online-Pressekonferenz der HHÖ nannte Assoc.Prof. Priv.Doz. Dr. Thomas Reiberger, (Klinische Abteilung für Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie im AKH-Wien, Uni.Klinik für Innere Medizin III, Med.Uni.Wien, Leiter AG Leber der ÖGGH) auch einige wichtige Zahlen: Weltweit gibt es laut rezenten WHO Daten 257.000.000 Hepatitis B Fälle und 71.000.000 Hepatitis C Fälle sowie 37,9 Millionen HIV betroffene Menschen. „In Bezug auf die Virushepatitis B und C wurde das globale Ziel einer Elimination (definiert über 90%ige Reduktion der Neuinfektionen und 65%ige Reduktion der assoziierten Todesfälle) für 2030 ausgegeben. In Österreich sind die Hocheffektiven Therapien für Hepatitis B und C breit verfügbar und daher sind wir auf einem guten Weg das Eliminationsziel für 2030 zu erreichen. Kritisch für den Erfolg der Elimination ist es allerdings, validierte Testungen mit niederschwelligem Zugang anzubieten und spezifische Mikroeliminationsprojekte für Risikogruppen durchzuführen. Die Österreichische Gesellschaft für Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie (ÖGGH) arbeitet gemeinsam mit der Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform gesunde Leber, um weitere effektive Teststrategien (wie zum Beispiel im Rahmen der European Testing Week) und niederschwelligen Zugang zu Information und Therapien für die Infektionserkrankungen Hepatitis B, C und HIV in Österreich anzubieten.“

Ein ausführliches Statement von Dr. Bernhard Benka, Bundesministerium für Soziales, Gesundheit, Pflege und Konsumentenschutz, finden Sie im Dokument in der Beilage.

Die Ziele

Auch wenn hier in Österreich für alle von HIV/Aids oder Viraler Hepatitis betroffenen eine Therapie zur Verfügung steht, so hinken wir allerdings bei der validierten Diagnose, den Tests, hinterher“, betont Widhalm. „Ohne die Betroffenen über einen validierten Test zu finden, kann ihnen unmöglich geholfen und somit die Infektion und Gefährdung weiterer Menschen garantiert nicht verhindert werden. In Österreich wurde es über die letzten Jahre schlicht versäumt, bundesweit selbstbestimmte qualitätsgesicherte niederschwellige Teststrukturen zu etablieren. Es wurde immer wieder am falschen Ort und Platz gespart“, meint die HHÖ-Vorsitzende. 

Um das langfristige Ziel, die Viren und Erreger effektiv zu eliminieren, auch tatsächlich erreichen zu können, müssen alle betroffenen Menschen entsprechend therapiert bzw. – wenn möglich – geheilt werden. Auf der anderen Seite ist aber auch die Impfungsrate (bei Hepatitis B) hoch zu halten, sodass weitere Ansteckungswellen verhindert werden können. Daher fordert die HHÖ: „Wir brauchen bundesweit – in Städten sowie im ländlichen Raum – qualitätsgesicherte niederschwellige Testmöglichkeiten für virale Erkrankungen, die an das Gesundheitssystem nahtlos angeschlossen sind. Dazu muss man die bestehenden Strukturen aufwerten, evaluieren und sinnvoll ergänzen.“

Aber auch im Bereich der Ent-Stigmatisierung sei noch viel zu tun, betont Widhalm. 

Strategischer Ansatz gefragt

Die HHÖ warnt allerdings davor, „planlos eine neue Autobahn quer über und durch das Gesundheitswesen zu bauen, die dann voraussichtlich 5 bis 10 Jahre lang für Corona genützt wird, bevor diese neuen Strukturen dann kostspielig wiederum abgebaut werden. Stattdessen ist es sinnvoller und effektiver, die bereits bestehenden Strukturen aufzuwerten und auszubauen“, ist Widhalm überzeugt. „International wird während der jetzigen Pandemie ein entsprechendes Mantra gepredigt: jeden notwendigen Kontakt mit dem Gesundheitssystem so effektiv wie möglich zu nützen. Eine Lehre die wir auch für ‚das Danach‘ beherzigen sollten: Aktuell werden in vielen Ländern Standarduntersuchungen bei Patientinnen und Patienten verschoben oder aber ‚geclustert‘ – also gehäuft – durchgeführt, sofern sie nicht dringend und notwendig sind. Alle Testmöglichkeiten müssen kombiniert und effektiver eingesetzt werden – und das nicht nur in Krisenzeiten.“

Österreich befindet sich noch immer mitten in der Pandemie. Und die virale Hepatitis und HIV/Aids muss endlich genauso als eine weltweite Gefahr gesehen werden. „Hätten wir in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten bei viraler Hepatitis so reagiert, wie jetzt bei COVID 19, hätten wir uns wahrscheinlich viel Leid und Belastung der Gesundheitssysteme erspart“, betont Widhalm abschließend.

Bleiben Sie gesund!

Über die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ)

Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich – Plattform Gesunde Leber (HHÖ)wurde im Jahr 2000 von engagierten Patienten gemeinsam mit Ärzten und den Partnern aus der Gesundheitspolitik gegründet. Seither fungiert der gemeinnützige Verein als Schnittstelle zwischen PatientInnen und MedizinerInnen, Behörden, Ministerien, Arbeiter- und Wirtschaftskammer, Sozialversicherungsträgern, Krankenkassen sowie regionalen Behörden hier in Österreich. Ein wissenschaftlicher Beirat, bestehend aus namhaften Fachärzten und Wissenschaftlern, gewährleistet die Zuverlässigkeit, Aktualität und Seriosität der medizinischen Informationen der HHÖ. Die Hepatitis Hilfe Österreich wird künftig noch enger als bisher mit allen zuständigen Behörden, Ministerien und einschlägigen Institutionen des Landes sowie den Medien zusammenarbeiten.

Hier geht´s zur Online-PK: https://youtu.be/tXQFQ3O-Y-o

Englische Statements finden Sie hier: https://youtu.be/t9V2o50w65g

Wir Danken für die Unterstützung:

Gilead Sciences GesmbH

AbbVie GmbH

Es wird Zeit etwas gegen virale Hepatitis zu tun! #WorldHepatitisDay

Der Welt-Hepatitis-Tag ist gekommen, und es ist an der Zeit unsere Stimmen zu erheben, um die Awareness von viraler Hepatitis zu erhöhen!

Wir werden die Elimination von viraler Hepatitis nicht erreichen, wenn die Menschen, die damit leben, ihre eigene Diagnose gar nicht kennen.

Wir müssen alle unseren Beitrag leisten, um die 290 Millionen Menschen die ahnungslos an viraler Hepatitis leiden, zu finden, damit wir ihnen eine entsprechende Therapie und Betreuung ermöglichen können.

An diesem Tag stehen wir gemeinsam, und warnen die Welt mit vereinter Stimme vor diesem lautlosen Killer, dem jedes Jahr 1,34 Millionen Menschen – und besonders darum geht es an diesem Tagvermeidbar zum Opfer fallen.

European Donor Day on September 9, 2017

In diesem Jahr findet am 9. September 2017 der Europäische Tag für Organspende und Transplantation (EODD) statt.

Die EODD informiert die Öffentlichkeit über die Spende und Transplantation von Organen, Geweben und Zellen. Pro Stunde werden 5 neue Patienten auf die Warteliste in Europa hinzugefügt, die Zahl der Europäer die auf ein Organ warten wächst somit wöchentlich um 840 PatiententInnen.

Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf der EODD website.

Hier die links dazu:

https://www.edqm.eu/en/events/european-day-organ-donation-and-transplantation

https://www.eodd2017.org

https://www.eodd2017.org/de/infos-zum-tag/botschaften-zum-tag/

 

Das sind die aktuellen Zahlen aus Europa.

14,533 Patienten auf der Warteliste per 1.1.2017

11,244 Registrierungen per Dez. 2016

6,988 Organtransplantationen von Verstorbenen in 2016

135,8 Millionen Einwohnern in der Region der Eurotransplant

 

Die Transplantationsmedizin lebt vom Austausch!

Natürlich ganz konkret vom Austausch kranker Organen gegen gesunde, aber auch vom Austausch von Informationen. Denn damit Organe transplantiert werden können, müssen viele medizinische Faktoren zwischen Spender und Empfänger übereinstimmen. Findet sich kein passender Patient im Land, wird das Organ einer ausländischen Partnerorganisation angeboten. Die Organspende ist also notwendigerweise keine rein nationale Angelegenheit: Österreich verdankt dem Austausch mit europäischen Partnerorganisationen, allen voran mit Frankreich und Kroatien, sehr viel.

Wissenstransfer

Die Transplantationsmedizin hat in kurzer Zeit grosse Entwicklungen durchgemacht und beeindruckende Fortschritte erzielt. Die Behandlungsmethoden werden laufend verfeinert, um die Lebensqualität der Organempfänger zu verbessern. Auch dabei findet ein reger internationaler Wissensaustausch statt.

Sensibilisierung

Alle Europäischen Länder unternehmen Anstrengungen, ihre Bevölkerung für die Organspende zu sensibilisieren. In ganz Europa sind die Spenderraten zu niedrig: Über 65‘000 Menschen warten in der Europäischen Union aktuell auf ein neues Organ, etwa 10 Personen pro Tag warten vergeblich und sterben. Dies zu ändern ist eine gemeinsame Aufgabe, zu der Österreich auch seinen Beitrag leistet.

Tage der Organspende – weltweit – europaweit

Europaweit zelebrieren wir deswegen am 9.9.2017 den «European Day for Organ Donation and Transplantation» (EODD) und den «World Day of Organ Donation and Transplantation» .

AW&AR

Videobericht Pressekonferenz Welthepatitistag 2017

Ein kurzer Beitrag über unsere Pressekonferenz sowie die vor Ort angeregt besprochenen Themen.

Wir danken erneut für das große Interessen der Medien in Österreich, die diesem lebenswichtigen Themenbereich in den letzten Wochen vermehrt Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt haben und weiterhin unsere Botschaft zu den Menschen, Betroffenen sowie Entscheidungsträgern tragen.

 

AR